This week the European Climate Foundation (ECF) launched Roadmap 2050, an extensive study that examines several decarbonisation scenarios for the power sector and sets out the near-term implications of the required long term commitment. The analysis for the report started in August 2009 and included input from industry collaborators regarding assumptions that could reasonably be made for each included technology, as well as input from several NGOs, including CAN E members WWF and E3G.

The mission of Roadmap 2050 is "to provide a practical, independent and objective analysis of pathways to achieve a low-carbon economy in Europe, in line with the energy security, environmental and economic goals of the European Union." The resulting report demonstrates the reality of creating a zero-carbon power sector. Required policy development and implementation would need to immediately focus on energy efficiency measures, regional grid interconnections, technology development and market reform.

For more information go to www.roadmap2050.eu and continue reading more for external comments on the report...

WWF EPO: The launch today of a ground-breaking study on various options for a carbon-free European power sector by 2050 is welcomed by WWF for showing that a 100% renewable electricity system would be as reliable as our power system today and would reduce Europe’s fossil fuel import costs. Commissioned by the European Climate Foundation (ECF), and in consultation with many large electricity companies and other organisations, the study shows that a 100% renewable electricity supply would only be 5 - 10% more expensive than the other low-carbon pathways considered in the study, without the risks posed by nuclear energy and fossil fuels, making it overall the best option.

Financial Times: No tariff rises seen in switch to greener electricity. Replacing Europe's existing energy infrastructure with low-carbon alternatives should not raise electricity prices in the long term. The authors found that using high levels of renewable energy did not lead to problems with the supply of electricity... The report found that this fear [of unreliable energy supply] was exaggerated and that high levels of renewables could be tolerated provided they are geographically dispersed and there is a"supergrid" connecting them.

International Herald Tribune: Renewable energy in Europe should be generated and distributed on a continental scale to make the greatest contribution toward reducing greenhouse gases, according to a report that raises significant challenges for a fragmented region. Such a grid would probably be easier to build in countries that span continents, as in the United States and China. In Europe, power grids remain largely confined to countries with limited cross border connections. These cross border connections would need to change if clean power is to be distributed more widely... The cost of energy to the economy should start to drop as of 2020 because of reduced fossil fuel use and efficiency savings that would help offset the cost of building a low-carbon infrastructure.

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Our Successes

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03-06-2013 Our successes

Our Successes

Find out about some of our key achievements in working to prevent dangerous climate change and promote sustainable climate and energy policy in Europe.  July 2014 Dirty 30 report CAN Europe, along...

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